International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women

25th Nov is International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, it also kicks off the  16 Days of Action Against Domestic Violence.

Related events

  • 16/05/16 All day

    16 Days of Action Against Domestic Violence is aimed at businesses that lack an infrastructure to deal with the large-scale problem that is domestic violence. As it stands, companies can do more to aid their employees who endure domestic violence, train those who witness it, and to protect staff as a whole, with the goal of securing safety and mitigating financial loss.

     

    [scp-button class="protect" link ="http://16daysofaction.co.uk/" title="Learn More"]

  • 25/11/16 - 10/12/16 All day

    16 Days of action against domestic violence – The campaign

    16 Days of Action Against Domestic Violence is aimed at businesses to support them to take action against domestic abuse and violence.  Employers have a legal obligation to assess dynamic risk and support the health and safety and wellness of their employees. Companies can do more to aid their employees who endure domestic violence, to train those who witness it, and to protect staff as a whole, with the goal of securing safety and mitigating financial loss. Spanning across 16 days from 25th November to 10th December, a theme will be identified each day to explore the various forms of domestic violence. In doing so, the workplace will be better equipped to acknowledge the signs that indicate it may be going on.

    To find out more go to www.16daysofaction.co.uk

     

     

     

     

  • 13/11/17 - 19/11/17 All day

    The aim of Alcohol Awareness Week is to get people thinking about alcohol – how it affects us as individuals, families, communities and society as a whole.

    Did you know that:

    • In the UK, in 2015 there were 8,758 alcohol-related deaths (around 14 per 100,000 people). The mortality rates are highest among people aged 55-64.
    • Alcohol misuse is the biggest risk factor for death, ill-health and disability among 15-49 year-olds in the UK, and the fifth biggest risk factor across all ages.
    • Alcohol harms are estimated to cost the NHS around £3.5 billion annually.
    • Alcohol is a causal factor in more than 60 medical conditions, including: mouth, throat, stomach, liver and breast cancers; high blood pressure, cirrhosis of the liver; and depression
    • In England and Wales, 63% of all alcohol-related deaths in 2014 were caused by alcoholic liver disease.
    • The number of older people between the ages of 60 and 74 admitted to hospitals in England with mental and behavioural disorders associated with alcohol use has risen by over 150% in the past ten years, while the figure for 15-59 years old has increased by 94%
    • Of the estimated 595,000 dependent drinkers in England, around 145,000 were in treatment in 2015, a fall of about 5% on the previous year.  Of these, around 60% successfully completed treatment.
    • Victims believed the offender(s) to be under the influence of alcohol in over half (53%) of all violent incidents, or 704,000 offences.
    • 64% of stranger violence, and 70% of violent incidents in the weekends, evenings and night are alcohol-related.
    • Alcohol-related crime in the UK is estimated to cost between £8bn and £13bn per year.
    • In 2015, there were over 8,000 casualties of drink driving accidents in the UK in 2013, including 220 fatalities and 1,160 serious injuries.
    • In 2014, 38% of school pupils (aged 11-15) said that they had drunk alcohol at least once, down from 62% in 1988. Of these, 8% of 11 year-olds reporting ever having drunk alcohol, compared to 69% of 15 year-olds.
    • 1% of 11 year-olds and 18% of 15 year-olds report drinking in the previous week. Mean consumption for 14 year-olds who report drinking in the previous week is 11.3 units.
  • 25/11/17 All day

    In 1991, a handful of men in Canada decided they had a responsibility to urge men to speak out against violence against women. They decided that wearing a white ribbon would be a symbol of men’s opposition to men’s violence against women. After only six weeks preparation, as many as one hundred thousand men across Canada wore a white ribbon. Many others were drawn into discussion and debate on the issue of men’s violence. There are now White Ribbon Campaigns operating in many countries around the world.
    The UK Branch of WRC was started in 2004
    Wearing a white ribbon is a personal pledge never to commit, condone or remain silent about violence against women. Each year, we urge men and boys to wear a ribbon for one or two weeks, starting on November 25, the International Day for the Eradication of Violence Against Women

  • 12/10/19 - 19/10/19 All day

    Hate crime is the term used to describe an incident or crime against someone based on a part of their identity.

    There are five categories of ‘identity’ when a person is targeted because of a hostility or prejudice towards their:

    • disability
    • race or ethnicity
    • religion or belief (which includes non-belief)
    • sexual orientation
    • gender identity.

    Hate crime can be any criminal or non-criminal act such as graffiti, vandalism to a property, name calling, assault or online abuse using social media.

    Experiencing hate crime can be a particularly frightening experience as you've been targeted because of who you are, or who or what your attacker thinks you are. Unlike non-identity related offences, the attack is very personal and specifically targeted, which means it’s less likely to be a random attack.

     

  • 25/11/19 - 24/11/20 All day

    White Ribbon UK was founded in 2005.

    To wear a White Ribbon is to pledge never to commit, excuse or remain silent about male violence. The message to men is to practice tolerance, respect and kindness, and to stand up against male violence, bullying and sexism in all forms.

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